All the Art I Want

All the Art I Want

Now that we have a house it's on to decorating, furnishing, and renovating- definitely not in that order. We've already got a start on the not-so-fun parts of the renovation, like converting from using heating oil to gas and ridding the basement of asbestos. We've also purchased a piece of furniture or two but the one thing that I've really gotten ahead on is picking out the art that will hang on my currently unpainted walls.

Brancusi's Studio at the Centre Pompidou. Image: Centre Pomidou.

Brancusi's Studio at the Centre Pompidou. Image: Centre Pomidou.

I'm definitely putting the cart ahead of the horse here, but I usually go to art for inspiration and it's hard to not do a bit of shopping when you're finding amazing things.

The vibe for the new house is sort of 1960s Parisian modernist meets low key glam. It's all about natural colors, textures, and materials; soft, curving shapes juxtaposed with hard angular shapes. It's Brancusi's studio at the Centre Pompidou but in a house from the 1920s in Queens. Obviously, when it comes to purchasing art, Brancusi is out of the question, so I've turned to contemporary artists for Brancusi-esque creations. 

Ariele Alasko

The artist Ariele Alasko happened to be a apart of my graduating class at Pratt. I always thought of her as a delightful person but wasn't familiar with her work while we were at school. After graduating I found her work on her blog, a simple site which displayed mostly reclaimed wood projects. But it has since evolved into a proper website with beautiful wood sculptures, brushes, spoons, and cutting boards. Her latest works are these absolutely wonderful, massive U-shaped solid wood sculptures that feel like amorphous creatures patterned by the grain of natural wood. It's a bit Delia Deetz, which makes it all the better.  

From Left to Right: Female 07 by Caroline Walls, Divide by Bradley Duncan, & Untiled Sculpture by Ariele Alasko.

From Left to Right: Female 07 by Caroline Walls, Divide by Bradley Duncan, & Untiled Sculpture by Ariele Alasko.

Apex, Aloe by Bradley Duncan. Image: Bradley Duncan 

Apex, Aloe by Bradley Duncan. Image: Bradley Duncan 

Caroline Walls

I'm also a big fan of Australian painter Caroline Walls, whose work primarily focuses on the sensual shapes of the woman's body. Her work is best when she abstracts the body into geometric blocks and slopes. I'm really into a print she's created of breasts but I feel a little strange having giant boobs hanging on my walls, especially in the dining room where I think it would look great. It just feels a little too Freudian or something. Fortunately there's so many other limited edition prints of her work.

Bradley Duncan

Bradley Duncan's work is a bit different from Caroline's and Ariele's; his work is very geometric and rigid. He makes hypermasculine wall sculptures using pegs to create grid motifs. The result is super impactful without feeling overwhelming. He's created pieces for a few Kelly Wearstler interiors and they are a great fit for her over the top sensibility, but they also work well in a simple gallery setting.

Cover Image Courtesy Caroline Walls

 

Chief Creative Officer at Alder New York, husband to Ayan Chatterjee, and father to @levitheig